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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
of trade, as well. yes, an ipad in china gets made and it's value point $50. but it's only about $20 of that that goes to china and the rest goes back to the u.s. we'll get into the dynamics of trade, as well, and how we measure it. we'll also be joined by the ilo director general, as well, guy rider. we'll hear from the head of the world intellectual property organization. so it's a big trade day here from geneva on "worldwide exchange." lots of great things to get into. and by the way, 157 members of the wto, shortly to be 158. kazakhstan today should get the approval, all 157 ambassadors are here. they will get approval later this afternoon. so an ever expanding membership base. >> kazakhstan being just the latest. plenty more from ross straight ahead on the program. in the meantime, we want to check in our how markets are doing. so much attention on italy. in particular, you can see the message broadly speaking this morning is in negative, we're seeing about a four to one outpacing decliners versus vapsers here. the stoxx 600 is down abo about .37%. let's take a look across the t
the results of that in around about 30 minutes. >>> and china and india secretary growth slowed in november. analysts say china and india's nonmanufacturing team expected to improve thanks to a hiring boost in the mainland as well as strong new orders in india. at the same time, china's new leadership, as we pointed out, has laid out some fresh directives. >> these are some pretty sweeping reforms making china's famously inefficient bureaucracy more efficient. it's an effort to "win the confidence and the support of the people" as public backlash rose against the special treatment of politicians. so a new list of dos and don't's for chinese leaders. on the do side, cut down on giving face. the art of extreme flattery or reverence, which results in some very long meetings and speeches. keep them short and cut down on the lavish feasts. he's also encouraging more travel to rural parts of the country where the real problems are. on the don't's side, stop the empty talk. in china, niceties are often more formal and exaggerated than west. another one is don't stop traffic. if you've ever been to
daily gain in more than thee years ago china gets ready to chart its new economic plan. domestic demand is strong enough to keep the lid on growth. >>> european markets get a lift from the latest european market data showing the private sector has expanded for the first time since april and signaling europe could avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it
with modest gains. europe holding onto gains and china up nearly 3% over night as shanghai catches a break. our road map begins with a $20 billion deal. freeport mcmoran getting into the energy business making two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's
. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had this number last week. reminds people, again, they've been right down, and up. mcdonald's is one of those things where joe asked me from squawk when we were talking, i said, i think this is a for real term. if they continue to innovate. i may this may not be your cup of tea, burger, but innovation s higher. >> they tried to sell it to consumers as opposed to their extra value menu, which is a little bit hi
.s. has slapped duties on wind turbine towers on china on price its says were unfairly cheap. this comes as washington welcomes a high-level chinese delegation led by the vice premier. his team is in the u.s. to talk trade and economy. he's expected to meet with u.s. treasury secretary tim geithner tomorrow. wang is the first official from the new leadership team to visit with the u.s. for more on the impact and implications of this, let's speak with frank ching, adjunct associate professor at the chinese university of hong kong. frank, hi. the first news that we're getting out of this appears to be more import duties s. this going to be the theme of u.s./china relations, or do you expect these meetings to be more of a thaw? >> well, i think that these are the first meetings since the new leadership in china was installed. and since president obama saw -- well, won second term. i think both sides want to make use of this occasion to improve their relationship. so this joint annual meeting is a platform, and i think that they will probably be able to achieve some progress on issues of con
.s. in general is looking positive. and the u.s. is creating a lot more jobs. china is still positive in the fourth quarter. china is going to show a slow and steady improvement. so we need those. >> higher expectations stronger in the likes of taiwan, india and brazil. let's go back to where you say they're weakest. greece, italy, spain, the netherlands. this is a very weak feature, indeed. how bad in it? >> it's bad. the eurozone is the global economic problem now. if you look at asia where i just returned from, both countries are feeling optimistic. but they seem to be inwardly focused now by being a triangle of china, india, indonesia. we're not seeing a great benefit into europe as we did before. for instance, germany is looking pretty pessimistic. based on its lack of export performance to places like china. >> yeah. when the bundes bank came out and shortly downgraded forecasts, how is the employment picture? if you've got a relatively healthy china and the u.s. consumer bounce back, wouldn't that help germany? >> it certainly would. germany is relatively flat in terms of the e
china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the reserve currency of the world, and certain other factors that i will touch upon later, what you can do is you can expand your deficit as long as you create the circum
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. li
a million reasons, well, it's a nokia phone, well, it's china. ipad miniis available. this is a stock that's so widely owned. it reminds me of sirius satellite. every doctor, every dentist owns apple. they don't know the price per share, they just know it is the proxy for the market. >> they just accelerated dividends. but i think we're talking now 150 companies in some fashion have accelerated or put forward a special dividend. you put forward a special market share, china is 76, with the market share at least. >> is it a disappointment that apple did not pay a special dividend? is that part of this? >> there was some of that. >> there was some expectation? not that they ever gave any voice to it. they never said a word about it. >> true. >> look, it is widely owned if the stock were -- it's obviously, here's the stock that went from 70 to 50, maybe it goes to 48, 45. everybody who doesn't know what apple is, other than the fact that they use an imac or iphone are selling it. and, look, if you're a hedge fund manager you went from thinking i have to own it, or i have to short it. . >> in
't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if this thing suddenly got off the rails. take a listen to mitch mcconnell last night talking about the pace of the negotiations here and the frustration that he's experienced going through all of this over the weekend. take a listen. >> now, i'm concerned about the lack of urgency here. like we all know we're running out of time. this is far too much at stake for political gamesmanship. we need to protect the american
. >> which might be a slightly better outturn. china seems to be back on track. is there anything in europe -- what's the tail risk at the moment? >> i think there's two things that could still go wrong in europe. one, there's always political risk. in italy, you do have elections coming up. there's a chance getting a higher share than people anticipate. but even then, the financial forces are going to force any government that comes into power to more or less stick to the plan morsi set out. on the other hand, there's always spain, the worries that with 25% unemployment, that you would see the default rate particularly on residential mortgages shoot up, it's 3% now, which is pretty amazing given the struggles within the economy, but we think it will go up somewhat, but really not any more than people have already priced in. >> and then ten year yields, 5.24%. at the moment, relatively speaking, pretty comfortable. >> maybe a little bit too comfortable and we certainly don't want to get complace complacent.yields are where they were say in march of this year and then subsequently they shot
quite good. it indicates that the economy in china is expanding again. that means that german companies can hope for new orders from china again, and the markets here can hope for new chinese money to be invested soon into german assets. >> let's take a quick look at some market numbers. the dax ended the day almost 1/2 of 1% up. the euro stoxx 50 closed up at 2582. the dow jones is currently going down about 1/4 of 1%. the euro is trading $1.3660. we turn our attention to syria, where the human cost of the civil war is not limited to loss and destruction inside the country. some half a million summer -- syrians are refugees in neighboring countries. >> for those studying abroad in europe, the anxiety about the safety of their loved ones can beat all consuming -- can be all-consuming. >> this man is torn between remaining where he is and returning to war-ravaged syria. he has been studying medicine in germany for five years and is now doing his residency. he is having trouble concentrating on his professional career. his family can no longer support him financially. that means he spends
saw that. i do think one thing we can certainly say given that china seems to be stabilizing a bit, we can all discuss europe. greek situation. maybe it's off the front pages for a while. and so if we assume that the jobs picture in the u.s. is not bad, let's assume not bad, it puts even more of a focus on the fiscal cliff negotiations because it becomes even more binding one would assume in terms of good or bad for the market, for the economy. >> kernen had a good point. does strength mean the economy could handle a cliff or is it so good you wouldn't want to tamper -- >> if i wanted to create a recession, what would i do? i would raise everybody's rates. i would cut the unemployment benefit. just trying to think of a theory of how i could cause a recession. i would cut back government spending quickly. >> i would raise interest rates to 20%. >> bernanke ought to join the -- look, i think this is what's going to happen. i think it's 50-50 we get a deal. no vacation. no legislation, no vacation. i think that when people get their paycheck at the end of january, they are going to be sho
, americans take out insurance to rebuild their lives. but in china, no such luck. after beijing's worst downpour in decades washed out this home, he and his wife had to borrow $3100 in friends and relatives to rebuild, a small fortune on his meager salary. there's no such thing as homeowners insurance, he says. the industry here has been agreeing over the past decade, but still underdeveloped with private policies largely a foreign idea. in countries like the united states, homeowners insurance replaces pretty much whatever somebody owns. about you but here there is no such guarantees, so people are forced to salvage whatever they can on their own. as more chinese get richer, many are looking for ways two o prot their wealth and lives. >> people are some savings, a first car and all that, typically insurance product is actually a very good product for them. >> right now car insurance is popular. china is expected to become the second largest insurance market behind the u.s. by 2020. and the competition is fierce, still dominated by chinese players like picc. international insurers face
it varies by market. we saw significant growth in asia, particularly in china, double digit growth even though supply was growing fast. what we saw in europe and the u.s., we saw supply growth was restrained because there wasn't bank finance and there still isn't which means rev par is growing 6%, 7%, 8%. so it's been quite a strong market and total revenues have grown, as well. demand has grown, we've seen a robust business for the last three years and we've grown highway patrol ahead of the market which is something we try to do. >> i note that you're still expanding, as one would maybe anticipate now and asia is still a very important market. how much expansion are you doing there? >> well, the u.s. is our biggest market, about 60%. china is about 10% of our business. it's about 30% of our clients. for our companies, we have about 11% or 12% of the total pipeline in the world and effectively 30% of that is china. so china is now our second biggest market. is between -- let me get the years right. between '09 and '11, our business doubled there from $1 billion to $2 billion a year. it
vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. to keep the factories going. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby entering into recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker and kissinger initially, and then volcker as the head of the fed had a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is game over. but if you are the united states of america and you have the rese
tomorrow. >>> the world bank in the meantime is raising its 2013 economic growth forecast for china and for developing east asia. the organization says that the region remains resilient despite the lackluster performance of the global economy. the world bank sees china expanding by 8.4% next year. it's expecting that it will be fueled by fiscal stimulus and the faster implementation of large investment projects. today's forecast is higher than an earlier one that was sited in a world bank report in october. 8.4%, not bad both if you can get it. >>> speaking of china, the united states is moving forward with plans to slap steep anti-dumping duties on wind turbine towers that are imported from china at prices that are deemed unfairly low. the news from the commerce department comes as u.s. officials welcomed a high-level chinese delegation for trade and economic talks. the u.s. trade panel has final approval over the duties and is expected to vote on the case in late january. >>> in corporate news, ubs hit with a $1.5 million fine today. that will add up, a few more of those. the swis
china, southeast asia or from as far as the u.s., norway, etcetera in buying korean won bonds and most likely these are from the sector due to their diversification needs and attracted by the korean bond markets. and if you look at the yields, although it has already come lower quite a lot, but if you compared that with treasury yields, that is very attractive. >> we'll leave it there. thank you very much. >>> now if you're just joining us here on "worldwide exchange," these are your headlines. a union at last. the eu finance ministers hand the ecb the power to supervisor more than 150 banks following another late nightmare thon session in brussels. the euro bounces on the news, but stocks in europe trade lower as ben bernanke warns monetary policy may not be enough to offset the damage if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> and the u.s. takes another surprising step tying interest rates to the u.s. unemployment rate. >>> plus, investors chairing danone plan to save $2 million over the next two years as they try to offset a slump in southern europe. >>> straight ahead on the progr
of nokia. it announced an exclusive deal with china mobile, the world's largest mobile-phone services provider. they have more than 700 million subscribers. >> let's take a quick look at some market numbers. the dax ended the day at about -- up about 1/4 of 1%. euro stoxx 50 closed just a a tad up. -- just a tad up. the dow jones is at 13,076. the euro is trading at 1.3079. >> un generate -- un secretary general ban ki-moon is calling on nations to come to an agreement about how to stop global warming. he made those comments at the climate talks in qatar. and he is trying to break a deadlock between the countries who are attending. >> our reporter has been talking to some delegates. >> at a climate summit press conference in doha, indian -- this indian spiritual leader described the effects of climate change in the himalayas. he says melting glaciers and a loss of bio-diversity are signs that the world cannot ignore, signs that drove him to do more to help the environment. >> giving the blessings to the people and healing that is not enough. i have to do more. the whole world is suffe
getting here often means a dangerous odyssey that takes years to complete. they flee through china, laos, and thailand. all the time, easy prey for traffickers who force girls into marriage or prostitution. those who make it to the south are brought to this resettlement center. they prepare for their new lives. they learn what health insurance is or how to operate simple electronic devices. they are shown south korean films to smooth their cultural integration. they teach defectors the basics of living in a 21st century capitalist society. >> for example, a hamburger. they do not have hamburgers in north korea. we show them what they look like, how they taste, and what they cost here in the south. >> back in his high school, the school principal is urging students to think big. he tells them, "although you are from the north, you can become president or a pop star. you have to live your dreams." >> i have a very simple dream. i just want to sit down with my full family around a table and eat dinner. my grandparents are still in the north. to be with them is my greatest wish. >> they are
the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about before that has grown up in 30 years comes out of the decisions made in the boardroom with the boards of directors and mothor shareholders about the profits. if the workers themseffeces distributed the profits collectively, would they give poor people $4s every body else says not enough? unlikely. the biggest
. china coming back. gm rationalizing europe. >> gm europe, when you say a couple quarters behind ford, are you saying progress in the quarterly financials? >> committed to rationalizing europe. >> again, a larger theme of excess capitalization at u.s. corporations, and the fact that so much money is sitting on balance sheets doing nothing. >> did you read oracle? how much money do they have. they bought back 10 billion worth of stock. these companies, you read through their stories, and you say, not only did they not extend themselves during this downturn, they conserved a lot of cash. by the way, humans did, too, in america. have you seen the numbers that the federal reserve put out last night about how much money is being -- how little debt is being taken down by citizens. we're back to levels of the '90s. federal household debt service came out last night. the percentage of disposable income is 14%, down to 10%. that's 1994 levels. >> that's a big part of morgan stanley's call on citi today. from overweight to equal weight. consumer deleveraging in their view coming to an end. and
with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the united states and talk about endin
. but competitors in china are, rush show were trading on a daily basis. -- my competitors in china and russia work training. this is a position of irritation of a triple jump. i was like a robot in the sense that everything i was doing, the hours i was putting in it, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, i trained all they basically. my first session, 10:00, i was basically of the rank by nine and my last session would be at 6:00-6:30. then i would go to the gym. i look back, no wonder i was in really good shape. >> where did that drive? how did that drive? where do you get that drive? >> we were talking earlier about the role of parents. when you had mentioned the tiger mom or the tiger parents, we did not have tiger parents. they were there to support me and be there in times when i needed a push culminated motivation. it is just one of those things when you have a passion and a vision. you do not see anything else. that is what drives you every day. >> you just got engaged. are you going to be a tiger mom. [laughter] >> looking at the way i was raised with a set of rules and just the way my
market news, a lot of talk about china this morning. a final reading of hsbc's manufacturing purchasing manager's survey for china rising in november, first time above the key 50 mark which indicates expanding rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens
can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude imports rose to the second highest daily rate on record. analysts say this is further evidence of the chinese recover. and i saw this story on -- every once in a while i check tweeting. >> i saw it on google, too. kayla tausche reporting -- >> kayla beat nick dunn. >> nick dunn was quoting kayla. >>
lessons in your book -- this may sound like a stretch, the people who live in china. i mean, this government's, it is -- you know, i don't know whether you call it -- certainly there is not the openness. well would you say to the leaders of china about there future? >> well, i would start by saying that the chinese leaders have drawn lessons from the story. the chinese leaders know this piece of history. of course, there's a similar time in their own history. and they also have studied very carefully the 80's in the end of the soviet union. and one of the decisions that they have made based on studying this piece of history is, they have made contemporary china less totalitarian in the sense that they do make people march in parades and they have abandon ideology in the sense of making people repeat things they don't believe in. and the pressures they put on people are coming in that sense, less. it is a much more subtle system where you are allowed to say some things in some context, but not others. you can talk about corruption, but you may be cannot criticize the party di
were running congress when we had a like nafta, china's most favorite nation status, the jvc, the world trade organization. all these trade deals people claim were going to bring jobs to the united states and in every case, the jobs left.
canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecologically that were not good for the earth's, things that people did to maximize profits. so, that is one thing. is there the possibility there might be a new economy that is not based on growth? second, if you do not have consumer demand at the same level that he used to -- and of course, i think that is why. one of the piece
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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